In the Faith that Looks through Death

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In the faith that looks through death.

This is one of final lines in William Wordsworth’s poems:  “Ode to Intimations of Immorality.”   It’s a line that I have meditated on and repeated in my head over and over again as I have walked into a crisis, held a hand, received disturbing news, heard of another tragedy, prayed in a time of uncertainty:

“In the faith that looks through death,  In the faith that looks through death,  In the faith that looks through death.”

Wordsworth writes, “Though nothing can bring back the hour of the splendor in the grass/of glory in the flower/ we will grieve not, rather find /Strength in what remains behind/In the  primal sympathy which having been must ever be;/ In the soothing which spring out of human suffering/  In the faith that looks through death.

Today marks the 16th year of my ordination as a minister in the Presbyterian Church.  Of all the words I have read, all of the books I have my shelves, all of quotes that I have clipped and saved,  these 7 stanzas were the first on my tongue 16 years ago, and they remain my favorite today.

This middle of career place where 16 years ago,  29 seems like a lifetime ago, – I was 29 once, right?  and imagining ministry 16 years from now, at the age of 61, seems hard to imagine. –Just how many more Christmas Eve sermons can I write?  How many more deaths can I face?  How many more tragic stories?  How many more night meetings, visioning projects, stewardship campaigns – What will the future be?   I see how quickly the past 16 years have come and gone, and know how quickly the next 16 years will pass by.  I am also ashamed to to find that I have the same fears and uncertainty today as I had then.  – Maybe it’s time to learn something and stop being uncertain of what will come. Maybe it’s time to let go of what I do not know and hold on to what I do know.  Maybe its time to shed a fear and replace it with conviction.  What time will I have wasted worrying when I look back 16 years from now?

And yet if I have learned anything these past 16 years, it is that one cannot expect another sixteen years. Today is all there is.  It’s cliche, I know, to talk about the gift of every day, of recognizing the frailty of life. We can’t live every day like it’s our last all of the time.  We can’t constantly be in that Thin Place.  We have to live as if there will be college campuses to visit and retirements to plan and vacations to take.  But every now and then, we need to go to the Thin Place where we sense that we are just on this side of heaven, and heaven is not so far away.

Wendell Berry expresses that feeling in this poem – another of my favorites, when he says, “sometimes here, we are there… and there is no death.”

“Some Sunday afternoon, it may be, you are sitting under your porch roof, looking down through the trees to the river, watching the rain. The circles made by the raindrops’ striking expand, intersect, dissolve, and suddenly (for you are getting on now, and much of your life is memory) the hands of the dead, who have been here with you, rest upon you tenderly as the rain rests shining upon the leaves. And you think then (for thought will come) of the strangeness of the thought of Heaven, for now you have imagined yourself there, remembering with longing this happiness, this rain. Sometimes here we are there, and there is no death.”
“1996, V”  [“Some Sunday afternoon, it may be”] by Wendell Berry, from This Day: New & Collected Sabbath Poems 1979-2012. © Counterpoint, 2013.

What I am trying to say is this is what I know:  sometimes here we are there, and there is no death and when we can see through death, we know that healing happens. Healing, in the truest sense of the word, is holy.  Healing, in the truest sense of the word, is human. It is the threading relationship of God and Human together in the wrestling  of Jacob, in the dark night of the soul of Jonah, in the blood sweat night prayer of Jesus, in the heart breaking cry of Mary, in the courage of Ruth, in the humanity of David, even in the shame of Judas. One cannot be healed if one does not have something that needs healing.  It’s only through the dark valley that we can recognize the light.   This is what it means to have the faith that looks through death.

This I know.  It’s really the only thing I know for absolute certainty.

Healing always happens.

Healing comes and people live and sometimes healing comes and people die, but healing always happens.

Healing happens through time and endurance and blood and bone. It happens deep in the soul and in the breaking of the heart.  It happens when the unseen are seen and the unheard are heard.  It happens in rest. It happens in laughter. It happens in time. It happens in pain.

It is healing that allows us to have the faith that looks through death.  That healing occurs only  through suffering. Only through loss and rainy days and times of loneliness. It is in moments like these that soothing thoughts come through suffering and help us to see a way through.

We must never give up on the human heart for it is where the Holy resides.  We must never give up on the belief that healing of mind, body, spirit, relationship, community, world, does, can and will happen.

Though nothing can bring back the splendor in the grass/the glory in the flower, we will grieve not, but rather find strength in what remains behind

…..

Thanks to the human heart by which we live,/ Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears/ To me the meanest flower that blows can give/ Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.  (William Wordsworth, 1770-1850).

 

 

A Mother’s Day, Without a Mother

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When my children were little, there were some standard books that we read every night before bed: “Good Night Moon,”  “Is Your Mama a Llama?”  “If you Give a Mouse a Cookie,”  “Are you my Mother?”  The Sleeping House,” and “Blueberries for Sal.”  I can recite them all for you now, if you would like.

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I can still hear the cadence of the writing, and feel the little body breathing on my chest, as we turned the familiar pages of these weathered books for the 100th time.  I can still remember the routine of bath, book, bed; the soft, cotton pajamas and the padded feet.  Night time rituals change as children get older.  Bed time becomes a requirement, instead of a sacred ritual.

Many of the books I read to my children,  are the same stories my mother read to me.  I loved when my mom read to me. I loved her voice. I loved the way she curved sentences  and how her voice changed with characters.  I loved the way she painted pictures in my mind by taking me into a story.  When I was little, our favorite books were, “Are You My Mother?”  and “Blueberries for Sal.”  Later, we would fall in love with “Little House in the Big Woods” and “A Wrinkle in Time.”

As I look back on these stories, and their underlying messages, there is similar message of comfort and safety in each of them, and that is “your mother is always with you,” and “if you are lost, she will pursue you, and until she finds you.”  These messages stay with us into our adulthood, and we trust in them like scripture.  So it’s a soul-shocking moment when one day our mom isn’t around anymore.  We only get one mom, and nobody really believes in us like they do.  This Mother’s Day,  my heart is heavy for those grieving their mothers.

But here’s the thing about our mothers – they pursue us even after death.  The children books we read about the pursing mother, aren’t giving us fall hope.  Nothing can separate us from the love of our mothers. They are relentless that way.  She’s with you.  She’s the voice that reminds you to wear a coat and to mind your manners.  She’s the smells of Sunday dinner and clean sheets on the bed.  She’s dirt on your hands, as you plant flowers for the spring and the touch of pages of the hymnal as you sing her favorite hymn.

To all of you have lost your Mom’s this year, I know Mother’s Day is going to be really, really hard, and you will want more than anything to see her laugh and let her tell you her opinion on your outfit.  I know you will feel like the little bird, looking for his mother.  Remember, the mother bird wasn’t really that far off.  She was always right where she was supposed to be.  I know you might feel lost and frightened, like Sal, but do not worry, she’s not very far off- she’s just on the other side of the mountain.

Close your eyes.  See her face.  Hear her voice.  See, she hasn’t gone far after all.

You are loved, always.

Peace.

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No Longer Silent

Ecclesiastes tells us there is a time and season for every purpose under heaven.  A time to be silent and a time to speak.  Over the past four months I have found myself silent, when I have wanted to speak.  I have internalized, lamented, swore, studied, and sought wisdom.  I have let other people carry the burden of speaking out for issues that I have agreed with, but have held back.  I have done this mainly because like it or not, I am a public person and I have not wanted to offend or isolate those whom I am called to serve. I care more about them, than my personal opinion.

Our society is so tribal right now. I have tried in vain to stay out of my tribe and move into a higher level of thinking – one that honors all people, sees that we all breathe the same air, walk the same earth, and fundamentally, I believe, share common values of loving our families and our country.   I refuse to place people in categories of “good or bad.”

That being said, as I have sat mainly on the sidelines and watched issues that are fundamental to my core values and beliefs be put on the auction block, I have sat on my hands, held my tongue, and closed my eyes.  I knew that there would be a time to be brave and now was the time to be wise.  So I sought wisdom. I sought higher understanding. I sought God.  I found Him on a brief spring break, when I visited the ocean.  The ocean didn’t seem to know what was going in the world. It didn’t seem to know that there was conflict on every continent that the ocean reached. dad's sunset The breathing waves just kept rolling, kept pulsing a heart beat as if to say, “I have been here long before you and I will be here long after.  There might not be any fish, or choral, or life in me, but I will still be here.”   As I sat on the warm, white beach of my childhood and felt the sun on my face, I realized again, how small we are and how big God is, and how much God trusts us to take care of what has been given to us. I told God that He might want to rethink that decision.  I sat on the beach, and cried for the creatures and for my great grandchildren, and I wondered if they would ever know the beauty of the ocean. – I still remained silent.

But now, today, something is happening, and I can no longer only seek wisdom.  It’s time to be brave.  Today, the President of the United States will  sign an executive order that will repeal the Johnson Amendment.

What’s the Johnson Amendment?

 It is one of the brightest lines in the legal separation between religion and politics. Under the provision, which was made in 1954, tax-exempt entities like churches and charitable organizations are unable to directly or indirectly participate in any political campaign on behalf of, or in opposition to, any candidate. Specifically, ministers are restricted from endorsing or opposing candidates from the pulpit. If they do, they risk losing their tax-exempt status.  (Jeremy Peters, February 2, 2017, New York Times.)

When I read about this in  February, 2017, I prayed it would go away, be forgotten in the piles of administrative priorities.  But today, on this the National Day of PrayChurch-and-State-300x200er, the President will be signing an executive order that will diminish that bright line that separates church and state in our country. By doing so, the President will open the door for a slippery slope of where the demarcation of church and state rest.

Let me tell you why this is dangerous.

In 1934,  almost immediately after the Nazi seizure of power in 1933, Protestant Christians faced pressure to “aryanize” the Church, expel Jewish Christians from the ordained ministry and adopt the Nazi “Führer Principle” as the organizing principle of church government. In general, the churches succumbed to these pressures, and many Christians embraced them willingly. The pro-Nazi “German Christian” movement became a force in the church. They glorified Adolf Hitler as a “German prophet” and preached that racial consciousness was a source of revelation alongside the Bible. But some Christians in Germany—including Lutheran and Reformed, liberal and neo-orthodox—opposed the encroachment of Nazi ideology on the Church’s proclamation.

At Barmen, this emerging “Confessing Church” adopted a declaration drafted by Reformed theologian Karl Barth and Lutheran theologian Hans Asmussen, which expressly repudiated the claim that other powers apart from Christ could be  God’s sources of God’s revelation.

Adapted from Robert McAfee Brown,Kairos: Three Prophetic Challenges to the Church, published in 1990 by Eerdmans.

The Barmen Declaration states:

1. “I am the Way and the Truth and the Life; no one comes to the Father except through me.” John 14:6

“Very truly, I tell you, anyone who does not enter the sheepfold through the gate but climbs in by another way is a thief and a bandit. I am the gate. Whoever enters by me will be saved.” John 10:1,9

Jesus Christ, as he is attested to us in Holy Scripture, is the one Word of God whom we have to hear, and whom we have to trust and obey in life and in death.

We reject the false doctrine that the Church could and should recognize as a source of its proclamation, beyond and besides this one Word of God, yet other events, powers, historic figures and truths as God’s revelation.

2. “Jesus Christ has been made wisdom and righteousness and sanctification and redemption for us by God.” 1 Cor. 1:30

As Jesus Christ is God’s comforting pronouncement of the forgiveness of all our sins, so, with equal seriousness, he is also God’s vigorous announcement of his claim upon our whole life. Through him there comes to us joyful liberation from the godless ties of this world for free, grateful service to his creatures.

We reject the false doctrine that there could be areas of our life in which we would not belong to Jesus Christ but to other lords, areas in which we would not need justification and sanctification through him.

3. “Let us, however, speak the truth in love, and in every respect grow into him who is the head, into Christ, from whom the whole body is joined together.” Eph. 4:15-16

The Christian Church is the community of brethren in which, in Word and sacrament, through the Holy Spirit, Jesus Christ acts in the present as Lord. With both its faith and its obedience, with both its message and its order, it has to testify in the midst of the sinful world, as the Church of pardoned sinners, that it belongs to him alone and lives and may live by his comfort and under his direction alone, in expectation of his appearing.

We reject the false doctrine that the Church could have permission to hand over the form of its message and of its order to whatever it itself might wish or to the vicissitudes of the prevailing ideological and political convictions of the day.

4. “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. It will not be so among you; but whoever wishes to have authority over you must be your servant.” Matt. 20:25-26

The various offices in the Church do not provide a basis for some to exercise authority over others but for the ministry [lit., “service”] with which the whole community has been entrusted and charged to be carried out.

We reject the false doctrine that, apart from this ministry, the Church could, and could have permission to, give itself or allow itself to be given special leaders [Führer] vested with ruling authority.

5. “Fear God. Honor the Emperor.” 1 Pet. 2:17

Scripture tells us that by divine appointment the State, in this still unredeemed world in which also the Church is situated, has the task of maintaining justice and peace, so far as human discernment and human ability make this possible, by means of the threat and use of force. The Church acknowledges with gratitude and reverence toward God the benefit of this, his appointment. It draws attention to God’s Dominion [Reich], God’s commandment and justice, and with these the responsibility of those who rule and those who are ruled. It trusts and obeys the power of the Word, by which God upholds all things.

We reject the false doctrine that beyond its special commission the State should and could become the sole and total order of human life and so fulfil the vocation of the Church as well.

We reject the false doctrine that beyond its special commission the Church should and could take on the nature, tasks and dignity which belong to the State and thus become itself an organ of the State.

6. “See, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” Matt. 28:20 “God’s Word is not fettered.” 2 Tim. 2:9

The Church’s commission, which is the foundation of its freedom, consists in this: in Christ’s stead, and so in the service of his own Word and work, to deliver all people, through preaching and sacrament, the message of the free grace of God.

We reject the false doctrine that with human vainglory the Church could place the Word and work of the Lord in the service of self- chosen desires, purposes and plans.

The Confessing Synod of the German Evangelical Church declares that it sees in the acknowledgment of these truths and in the rejection of these errors the indispensable theological basis of the German Evangelical Church as a confederation of Confessing Churches. It calls upon all who can stand in solidarity with its Declaration to be mindful of these theological findings in all their decisions concerning Church and State. It appeals to all concerned to return to unity in faith hope and love.

Verbum Dei manet in aeternum.
The Word of God will last for ever.

I don’t know if I can fully comprehend the bravery it took for the authors of the Barmen Declaration to write these words in Germany in 1934, under the barrel of Hitler and the Third Reich.   I do know that I will not let their brave words, which are part of my tradition’s confessions, be forgotten.

Furthermore, let me say this:  any pastor who uses the sanctity of the pulpit for their own political views, or the political advancement of another person, desecrates the integrity of their position and the Word they are called to preach.

Regardless of what the President does today, I call on clergy of every stripe to stand firm in their integrity and say they will not violate their calling to preach the Word alone and not become mouth pieces and pawns for the political flavor of the day.

The grass withers, the flower fades, but the Word of the Lord stands forever.

 

 

 

 

Turmoil

When he entered Jerusalem, the whole city was in turmoil, asking, “Who is this?”  The crowds were saying, “This is the prophet Jesus from Nazareth in Galilee.”

Matthew 21:10-11

Tur·moil

ˈtərˌmoil/
noun
  1. a state of great disturbance, confusion, or uncertainty.

I have read the account of Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem at the beginning of Holy Week for almost 20 years and this was the first time that I noticed that word:  Turmoil.

Matthew says, after Jesus came into the city, fulfilling the prophecies foretold in Isaiah and Jeremiah, that the city was in turmoil.

When my dad was growing up in Danville, Illinois, he and his neighborhood frienimagesds would play in the back allies of their neighborhood.  They would play baseball, basketball, kick ball, and run the neighborhood with freedom and curiosity.  One day, the boys were playing along a back fence overgrown with tall grass and weeds, the boys came along a suspicious looking piece of nature and instead of leaving it alone, they, like most boys, decided to poke at it, take it down and hit it.  That suspicious looking piece of nature was a beehive.  The bees were not happy to have their home plummeted so they took off toward the boys, and the boys ran screaming down the ally, and into their homes, where the bees chased them into their house, where there happened to be company, and tea and cake, and a card game, and women jumped on the chairs and screeched as they shook their dresses and the boys dove under tables trying to escape the enraged bees.

Turmoil. ” A state of great disturbance, confusion or uncertainty.”

I was speaking to a parishioner the other day about church and worship and what people need and why they are coming to church, or should be, and she remarked that people are really scared.  She did not specify what people are scared of, only that they are scared.  Maybe what they are afraid of is obvious and goes without saying, or maybe naming the fear is important.

Here are some the fears I have heard expressed in the past three months in meetings, or over a meal, or in emails, or conversations.

  1. There is going to a Third World War, a nuclear war, or another civil war.
  2.  The economy is going to get so bad that the United States will become a third world country.
  3. The National Parks, the air, the water, the earth, natural resources, and animals are in great peril.
  4. Our education system is on the edge of collapse.
  5. Our health care system is in ruins.
  6. Our freedoms are being taken away. Our rights are being denied.
  7. “They” are going to take over.
  8. What fears have you heard? 
  9. Whose fears do you think are unfounded?

When people are afraid, they only see their fear and they really can’t see much else. Their fear defines them and the choices they make are driven by those fears.

I remember people were afraid the world would come to an end in the year 2000.  They started storing up canned goods and boarding up windows just in case.  Those of us who did not share that fear thought they were a little crazy.    They feared turmoil to the point that they created turmoil.

Is turmoil the same as fear?  Or is it more like anxiety?

The Gospel of Matthew tells us that the people were turmoil.  Why?  Were they more afraid or anxious? Maybe both.  Either way, they knew that something was going to happen and that after whatever it was, everything would be different.  The NIV says, that the people were stirred,  which sounds less intense than turmoil doesn’t it?

When the Prince of Peace arrived in Jerusalem, there was turmoil in the city.  There was chaos.  The city felt like a provoked beehive.  Things were stirred up.

I wonder, is that the state we are in?  Are we in turmoil?  Are we stirred up?  Do we feel disturbed, confused and uncertain?  Do we have good reason?

Maybe Jesus is in the city.  Maybe Jesus has kicked the beehive of humanity and stirred us up.  Maybe there is a disturbance,  a greater sense of uncertainty, and maybe there should be – because Jesus is over turning the money changers in the temple.  He is speaking truth to power.  He is advocating for the poor.  He is praying in the garden.   He is breaking bread.  He is pouring the cup. He is washing feet.   He is sweating drops of blood. He is suffering.  He is forgiving.  He is dying.

Turmoil reminds us that Jesus is in the city.   It’s the paradox of peace.  You cannot know peace if you don’t know unrest.  Order comes out chaos.  Chaos comes first.  So where ever there is unrest in our lives, personally or globally, where ever we find ourselves running away from, whatever is inflamed, Jesus is there. – We best pay attention.

34 “Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword. 35 For I have come to turn

“‘a man against his father,
    a daughter against her mother,
a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law—
36     a man’s enemies will be the members of his own household.’

37 “Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. 38 Whoever does not take up their cross and follow me is not worthy of me. 39 Whoever finds their life will lose it, and whoever loses their life for my sake will find it. –  (Matthew 10:34-38)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moments of Clarity

creating sacred communities

There are moments when I wonder why I am a pastor. I get frustrated with denominational dilly-dallying, Presbytery pandering and session snarkiness. Sometimes I wonder if ministry matters. The world tells us that the church matters less today, or it matters in a different way today than it has in the past. Sometimes I get tired of the process, the budget, the need to over communicate, and the politics. Sometimes I can worry if my profession will become obsolete.

And then God gives me moments of clarity.

When I talk to children about Jesus dying on the cross and we draw pictures of heaven, and one little boy’s depiction looks like the set from “Dance Fever” and he tells me that heaven has a dance floor.

When an elderly woman walks out of the sanctuary, clutching her cane, with tears down her face because she is in such pain, and…

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The Way of Wisdom

13 Blessed are those who find wisdom, those who gain understanding,

Proverbs 3:13

wayofwisdom

ˈwizdəm/

noun

  • the quality of having experience, knowledge, and good judgment; the quality of being wise.
  • the soundness of an action or decision with regard to the application of experience, knowledge, and good judgment.
  • the body of knowledge and principles that develops within a specified society or period.

 

We are living in a time of high volatility.  Every click on the computer and swipe on the phone, causes a reaction, a feeling of threat, or defense, anger, or fear, frustration, or confusion.  People are on high alert and they take their reactivity with them into every day life,  at checkout counters, the doctor’s office, parent-teacher conferences, and on the highway. Events that would have been looked over, now cause a reaction.  People feel free to say unfair, unkind, and untrue statements that create a toxic fume that permeates the atmosphere.  All someone needs to do is a light a match.

This season of unpredictability makes us jumpy and we often find ourselves in a state of reactivity.  It would behoove the world, to move away from being right and into a place of being wise.

Think for a second:  When was the last time you sought wisdom?

Wisdom is different from knowledge. One can be intelligent and not wise.  Wisdom is not seeking answers, it is seeking understanding.  Wisdom comes from experience. It comes from suffering.  It comes from observing. It comes from a place of humility. Wisdom begins by being more connected to God and less connected to the world. – Not that we forget about the world, but rather, we spend less time being driven by it.

We seek wisdom, by finding solitude.  Henri Nouwen wrote:

 “Solitude is the furnace of transformation. Without solitude we remain victims of our society and continue to be entangled in the illusions of the false self. Jesus himself entered into this furnace. There he was tempted with the three compulsions of the world: to be relevant (‘turn stones into loaves’), to be spectacular (‘throw yourself down’), and to be powerful (‘I will give you all these kingdoms’). There he affirmed God as the only source of his identity (‘You must worship the Lord your God and serve him alone’). Solitude is the place of the great struggle and the great encounter – the struggle against the compulsions of the false self, and the encounter with the loving God who offers himself as the substance of the new self.”

― Henri J.M. NouwenThe Way of the Heart: The Spirituality of the Desert Fathers and Mothers

The season of Lent is here. The wild month of February has ended, and the liturgical calendar beckons us to come into the wilderness, into a season of solitude.

Solitude is not found at the spa or on the beach,  it’s found within yourself.  It’s found when you quiet your mind, go deeper into yourself, so that you may come out wiser, more self-aware, less reactive, more compassionate. Solitude is found when we fast from that which keeps us from God, and when we feast on that which draws us to Him.

Fast from judgment, Feast on compassion
Fast from greed, Feast on sharing
Fast from scarcity, Feast on abundance
Fast from fear, Feast on peace
Fast from lies, Feast on truth
Fast from gossip, Feast on praise
Fast from anxiety, Feast on patience
Fast from evil, Feast on kindness
Fast from apathy, Feast on engagement
Fast from discontent, Feast on gratitude
Fast from noise, Feast on silence
Fast from discouragement, Feast on hope
Fast from hatred, Feast on love

What does solitude look like?

“In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.” 

― Albert CamusThe Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

If you want to understand the world, step away from it.

  • Turn off Facebook for 40 Days.
  • Limit your access towhatever your news choice is and allow yourself only the headlines. If you watch one news station that is more to your ilk, read another news choice that is not of your liking. Read enough to understand, but not so much as to be consumed.
  • Take a screen Sabbath.
  • Spend more time creating, get a bird feeder,  bake,  give, read, and be kind to strangers.
  • Take all of the time that you spend worrying, annoyed, frustrated, angry, or sad and turn your energy to your soul and connecting with God and thinking about God’s love, God’s grace, and God’s forgiveness.
  • Be in a more intimate relationship with God than you are with your phone.
  • Every time your mind is triggered with worry or frustration, stop, say a word, and reconnect with the God of all human history.
  • Spend more time thinking about what you for, than what you are against. Spend more energy on love than on hate.  Think on these things.

Once we have spent time in solitude, finding ourselves closer to God, then we are to the world – then and only then, can  we respond to the world.

Take that time in solitude to pray.  Pray for your enemies.  Pray for the liberal. Pray for the conservative. Pray for the immigrant.  Pray for the teacher. Pray for the leader. Pray for your neighbor. Pray for the employer. Pray for the picker. Pray for the reporter. Pray for the parent. Pray for the child. Pray for the water. Pray for the air. Pray for the trees. Pray for the wealthy. Pray for the poor.  Pray for the greedy.  Pray for the generous.  Pray for the church. Pray for the mosque. Pray for the temple.  Pray for the Native American. Pray for the Latino. Pray for the African-American. Pray for the Asian. Pray for the White. Pray for the Gay. Pray for the Straight.  Pray for the married. Pray for the single.  Pray for the lonely. Pray for the homeless. Pray for the hungry. Pray for your enemies.  Pray for those you love.  Pray for people you do not understand. Pray to be understood.

“We live, in fact, in a world starved for solitude, silence, and private: and therefore starved for meditation and true friendship.”
― C.S. LewisThe Weight of Glory

If we can find a way to solitude, we will gain wisdom. If we can gain wisdom, we will know God. If we know God, we will speak the truth not be afraid.  There is a time to be brave. Bravery will come when wisdom is discerned.

You are wiser than you give yourself credit.  After all, God abides in you and you in him.  Seek God and you will know peace.

Next week I will write about finding wisdom in the hardest moments.

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How do I explain this to my children?

In a couple of hours I have to wake my children for the day and tell them that the world changed over night.  I have to tell them who our next President is going to be.  He’s the type of individual whose values are not personally shared by our family.  He is not the kind of person I would want my children to grow up to be.  When they hear the outcome of the election, I know they will be afraid.

I wonder, is it I who am afraid?  Am I projecting my fears for them, and their future and the ideals of democracy on to them?  Is it easier for me to be address their fears than to face my own?   – Maybe so.

How do we respond when we feel the earth move beneath us and we find ourselves in uncertain territory?  As I thought about my children, sleeping peacefully upstairs, I thought about how the values  and ideals that we talk about and believe, have not changed, and are more important now than ever before.  These are the values that we need to hold on to. These are the values that we have to see lived out.

We now have to practice more than ever what it is we believe.

Hold to the good
Stand for justice
Love your neighbor
Pray for your enemy
Consider the lilies
Defend liberty
Persevere
Be not afraid

This is what I will tell my children when they wake up in the morning.

 

A Love Story

I have been thinking about my Grandparents a lot lately, more than usual.  They are both gone now, and with them an era, that I wonder will soon be forgotten.  An era of saving bread bags, napkins from Dairy Queen and fat from skillets.  An era of tools in the shed and strawberries in the garden, and fresh, ironed sheets and vinegar and water cleaned, windows.  An era of fresh-squeezed lemonade on the patio and plastic on the davenport.

My grandparents were characters.  Visiting them was like stepping into a book, where it was normal behavior to go dumpster diving for things that could be brought home and made  “good as new,” and meals were as sacred and as approachable as the Communion Table.  Where neighbors were known, and people came to visit through the back door.  Where hard work was valued above anything else.

I miss them.  I wish they were here to provide a historical perspective on things.  I wish I could ask them one more time about what they endured and what they overcame.

In my grandmother’s house, among her  Swedish horses and Hummel figurines, between the two chairs always sat a little, velvet dog with shaggy ears and shaggy feet.  He was really the only thing I was allowed to touch in the living room, and so I did.  He was soft and real looking, with a black nose and inquisitive eyes.  Grandma always said that he was her dog.  For some reason, they could never bring themselves to get an inside dog.  Maybe because it would be too expensive, or bring about too great of a mess, or be too much trouble, or chew up the couch, for whatever reason, an inside dog was replaced with the pretend dog that always behaved and never moved.

My grandmother died suddenly one day, leaving my grandpa with a house full of memories and tools and baking dishes.   Gradually, they sold everything, including the house, and eventually his car.  He moved into an assisted living facility.

The thing you need to understand about my Grandpa is that he never met a stranger.  To a point of irritation, you could not take him anywhere without him talking to the the waiter, the cook,  the mechanic, the teller and if there was a child in the room – forget it.  He could not pass by a child without a smile, or a game, or a gesture of compassion. The other thing you need to know is that he was completely deaf.

What do you with a deaf, widower, who loves people but cannot engage in conversations?   You get him a dog.

My mom found a little, white, shih tzu and brought him to his new home.  He named her Mitzi, for that’s what Grandma would have wanted.  From that day on, Mitzi and Grandpa were inseparable, and suddenly Grandpa became the most popular person  in the senior living center.   They would go for long walks, or she would ride proudly on  the seat of his walker.  She would crawl up on his lap and take long naps, and she was always willing to greet a stranger or engage with a child.  She was his greatest gift.

Years passed, grandpa aged, and aged, and aged until he looked like Old Man Time.  Eventually he slept more than he was awake, and Mitzi moved in with my parents and would come and pay him visits.  Mitzi would jump on the quilt, right next to him and they would sleep from lunch until dinner, as the warm sun streamed in and the trees watched over.

Grandpa died at 99.

Mitzi died yesterday.  She was 107.

I don’t know if two beings could have loved each other more than my Grandpa and Mitzi.  Love stories that are real, are the stories that sometimes occur between humans, and sometimes occur between animals and sometime  occur in communities.  They are stories that always have an arc of trial and persistence. They are the stories that aren’t very exciting, but are rather, mundane, constant, and sustaining.

Alan de Bottom wrote on Love: “Perhaps it is true that we do not really exist until there is someone there to see us existing, we cannot properly speak until there is someone who can understand what we are saying in essence, we are not wholly alive until we are loved.”

While I cannot go back to those days of pies cooling on the counter and turns in the hammock,  there is a presence that stays with me.  It’s not sexy or particularly earth shattering.  It’s there, like a little dog who will  never leave your side.  It’s a gift that says while the world may be different, and life will surely change again and again and again, one thing  remains constant.

It can only be love.

Happy Valentine’s Day.

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The Atticus Project

atticus-finch-and-scout

My High School  Freshman is reading Harper Lee’s, To Kill A Mockingbird  in her English class.  The poor thing doesn’t have a chance, with two parents who have their own personal copies between us and own the movie, we are on her every minute, asking her “where she is in the book, what’s happening now, and has she gotten to the trial yet?”

It’s a beautiful book, with rich story telling of childhood, summertime, make-believe and growing up  in a time of political and social unrest.  Remember how Scout has to encounter her classmates and even her relatives say that Atticus is a  word that she is not aloud to say and doesn’t know what it means, or what they mean when they say it?  Remember how Atticus knows he is going to lose the case, but he takes the case anyway?  Remember how he tried to protect her and Jem from comments from a community that just assumed he be quiet? Remember how she curled up next to him on the porch swing, after she got in a fight with a classmate, and he said, “You never can fully understand someone until you consider things from his point of view” and then went on to say that “you need to climb into another person’s skin and walk around in it.”

That strong, protagonist we all admired was Atticus Finch.

Atticus never spoke harshly of his neighbors or of any person who saw the world differently than he did. He treated everyone, regardless of class or race with the same respect and dignity. He never tried to convince them to change their minds or call them names or demeaned their position.  He did try to be a voice of reason in a community that was divided racially and socio-economically.  In essence, he lived a life of integrity. He said, “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.”

I dream of a world where we all find the Atticus living inside us.

We need to launch an Atticus Project in our nation. Imagine a world where we all take the higher ground. A fire has been stoked that is now ablaze and we have become far too comfortable using language that is divisive and obstructive. We need to calm down. That doesn’t mean we don’t speak the truth in love, or refrain from standing for the innocent, or abandon our integrity.  We do that and remain in relationship with each other.

My biggest worry, or fear, or anxiety is that some day there will be a crisis. -A storm will come, made by nature or man,  and we will all need each other.  We will need to bring a meal to a neighbor, a hand to a friend, water to a stranger, and it will not matter where we stand on the issues, it will matter that we stand together.

We need to take all of the anger and distrust and frustration we are feeling and turn those feelings into a movement of radical empathy. I got this term from this article in the Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/02/a-third-way-in-the-respectability-politics-debate/514667/

Empathy is a building block of morality—for people to follow the Golden Rule, it helps if they can put themselves in someone else’s shoes. It is also a key ingredient of successful relationships because it helps us understand the perspectives, needs, and intentions of others.

Without empathy, our morality crumbles.   Studies show that empathy is good for your health, it reduces bullying, it’s good for your marriage, and it reduces prejudice and racism.  Without empathy there cannot be a just society.

So I am calling for each and every one of us to participate in the Atticus Project.  A project in which we will try to be less judgmental and more empathetic.  A project in which we look upon our friends and strangers and try to see where they are coming from.

You look across the way and you think, “Man they are really scared.  I don’t really understand why they are scared, and I think they are really stupid for being scared, but they are scared.  I do not share their fear, but I have been afraid before. I know what fear feels like, I’ve been there. I know what I needed to hear when I was scared, maybe I can listen.”

You look across the way and you think, “Man, they are really happy.  They are so enthusiastic about the future and how things are going.  I don’t really share their hope, but I remember when I felt hopeful.  I remember feeling really annoyed with anyone who rained on my parade.  I remember wishing they would come on board and get with the program.   I can’t really do that, but I can respect that they feel hopeful, even though I don’t, maybe I can listen.”

My other daughter is studying India and is sitting across from me at the dining room table as I write this.  She just asked me how Ghandi died. I remember the story of how he brought a divided nation together and I remembered his words, “I offer you peace. I offer you love. I offer you friendship. I see your beauty. I hear your need. I feel your feelings. My wisdom flows from the Highest Source. I salute that Source in you. Let us work together for unity and love.”

Finally, and personally, I believe this is the work of the church.  The church must express at it’s very foundation the commandment to do unto others as you would have them to do you.  We must show the love of Christ to our neighbors, even the one’s we would rather not have over to dinner.  Peace begins with us.

May the Peace of Christ be with you.

 

Gregory Peck, Mary Badham

Making Sense of it All

I’m trying to make sense of all of this.  I’m trying to understand what is going on.  The more I try, the more concerned I become.  Every day I read articles from a variety of news columns to try to understand how people are seeing the world, and more importantly to try to identify with how readers who only read one perspective may be seeing the world.

This morning I read these four articles, each providing very different perspectives.  While their individual opinions are worthy of discussion, what I care more about is how we as citizens, who have different opinions can have civil conversations on these different opinions.  I want a real conversation without name calling, eye rolling, or sensationalizing.

We need to understand each other.

Here are the four articles I read today. Notice how  they are written.  Notice the audience they believe is reading the article.  Think critically about each article.  What do we learn about the writer, the reader and the world, by reading these four articles?  What do we learn about ourselves?

Could we pull these opposing articles out and have a mature conversation about what is going on in the world?   Can we read these articles and not getting angry, emotional, or defensive?  Could we work together to try to make sense of it all?

The first article I read was by Keith Ablow from Fox News:

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/01/27/dr-keith-ablow-whats-really-going-on-in-trumps-mind-hint-its-not-what-think.html

And then I read this article by David Brooks from the New York Times:https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/opinion/the-politics-of-cowardice.html?rref=collection%2Fcolumn%2Fdavid-brooks&action=click&contentCollection=opinion&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collectionolit

 

 

Then I read this article by Newt Gingrich from Fox News:

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/01/27/newt-gingrich-left-should-be-scared-to-death-after-trumps-first-week.html

I finished my Saturday morning circuit with this article by Jim Wallis:

https://sojo.net/articles/christians-call-speak-truth-alternative-facts

If you have read all four of the articles by now, you are probably not interested in reading further.  So I will end here and say that I think we need to force ourselves to read and engage in conversations with opposing points of view.  We have to try to understand each other.  If we don’t, we are just screaming into the wind.

We must seek first to understand than to be understood.